How to ask for that raise at work

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You’ve been agonizing over it for weeks now, but the time has come, and you need to ask for a raise. You feel like you’re worth more to the company than they are paying you so you’ll have to approach someone to get more dollars in your pocket. Asking for a raise at work can be tricky and intimidating, but we have some tips that will help you get the ball rolling.

Timing is important

It is important to acknowledge that your boss is likely very busy. If you casually stroll into their office while they are in the middle of something they probably won’t want to spend much time discussing your issue.

Arrange a meeting with your boss so they can put aside some time to speak freely with you, without the distractions of work getting in the way. It also saves you speaking with them at a time when they are in a bad mood. If your boss is happy, they are more likely to agree to your raise.

Be honest

If you have been doing the same job for a while, it is acceptable to have a sit down with your boss to discuss your long-term goals and ask for feedback. You can let your boss know that while you are happy doing your job now, you are ambitious and would like to progress. Taking on more responsibility is something you can ask to do to help you get that raise you’ve been looking for.

Plan your discussion

Your boss isn’t likely to just hand you more money each month, so you’ll probably have to try and convince them that what you contribute to the workplace is adding value. Think of examples where you have gone above and beyond your job description as this will let your boss see that you are capable of contributing to the collective goals of the company.

Don’t just go in and say Susan in accounts told you other people are getting paid more than you as this might come across negatively during your discussion. Make sure you objectively look at what you’ve been contributing and ask yourself whether you deserve a raise or not.

Research

Do some research to see what sort of figure you should be asking for. Don’t just pluck a number out of your head, look at similar jobs other companies are advertising. Your pay should reflect the current market value someone doing your job makes, so make sure you let your boss know what that is. Be aware of the financial state of the company, if they are laying people off then they probably can’t afford to give you more money.

Things not to do

Do not give your boss an ultimatum. If you threaten to leave if they don’t give you a raise they might just call you out on it. A similar approach would be to avoid telling them you need the money. You might do, but it isn’t demonstrating to them what you offer to the company. If you require more money you might have to ask for more duties, this will, in the long-term, make your chances of promotion more favorable, not just a pay rise.

Asking for a raise is not easy, and it will take careful consideration before you approach your boss for it. Make sure you think you genuinely deserve to be paid more and bring plenty of examples to show why you are so awesome to present to your boss. Be confident and ask your boss to set aside some time to discuss it with you.

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